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Despite Having Empty Seats, Violinist Is Kicked Off Flight After Refusing To Check In $80,000 Instrument

Well-known violinist Emmanuel Borowsky was recently booted from a flight due to his unwillingness to check his instrument into the cargo hold.

Most of you reading this have felt the pain of trying to squeeze all of your luggage into the right sized bags before going on holiday. Not only conforming to the weight limit the airline has laid out for your checked luggage, but also keeping your carry-on within the correct dimensions too. It would help if there was a blanket limit for all airlines but that would just make things too easy, right?

If your luggage exceeds the weight limit and you don't realize until you arrive for your flight, you have two options. Either pay extra, and it is normally a lot extra, or frantically start removing clothes from the bag and putting them on, turning you into some sort of human onion. As bad as both of those options sound, thank your lucky stars you weren't Emmanuel Borowsky.

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The violinist was due to take a flight from Manchester-Boston Regional Airport to Baltimore on Monday, November 5th, 2018. Despite being on time for the flight, with Southwest Airlines, the overhead storage bin was already full and therefore had no room for his precious violin when he boarded. However, Borowsky noticed that everyone was on the plane and there were plenty of empty seats, so he placed the instrument securely in the seat next to him.

Despite being a loyal Southwest customer who uses them exclusively when the option is available, I am very disappointed...

Posted by Emmanuel A. Borowsky on Monday, November 5, 2018

Seems fair enough to us, but apparently not. Borowsky took to Facebook to speak of his experience, revealing that staff aboard the Southwest flight told him he would need to check his violin. Since the instrument is worth $80,000, according to Fox News, that wasn't really an option for the musician. Since he wouldn't check the violin, Borowsky was asked to leave the aircraft.

To make matters even worse, Borowsky was also not allowed to board the next flight three hours later since priority boarders had filled the overhead storage. Eventually, seven and a half hours later, the musician's flight to Baltimore was underway. However, by that point, he had already missed a number of meetings and engagements. Yes, airlines have rules to enforce, but you would think common sense would prevail in certain situations such as these.

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