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Coffee Made By Tribal Farmers Wins Top Award In Prix Epicures

A coffee grown and produced by tribal farmers in southern India has just won one of the industry's top accolades and its producers are looking to grow their network.

Coffee might very well be the most popular beverage in the world. In fact, according to Haley's Daily Blog, it is the third most consumed drink on the planet. Only water and tea are more popular. It comes in countless different varieties, most of it from exotic, far away lands and those varieties are diversified even more by what we choose to add to it once we get our hands on some.

There are only certain parts of the world where the climate allows coffee to be grown. South American countries such as Brazil and Colombia are famous for their coffees. Ethiopia and Kenya top the charts when it comes to African coffee producing countries. And you'll also find plenty of it in Indonesia, hence its nickname 'Java'.

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While India is also famous for its coffee production, you probably haven't heard of Araku Valley Coffee. The beans for this relatively unknown Indian coffee brand are grown in the South Indian state of Andhra Pradesh according to NDTV. The beans are grown and the coffee is produced by tribal farmers that inhabit the 150 different communities that fill the valley, and it has recently won a pretty prestigious award.

Despite being grown by tribal farmers thousands of miles away, the coffee has become a hit in Paris. More specifically in the Upper-Marais neighborhood where the brand opened a coffee shop. Clearly, it has had quite the impact as it was announced that Araku Valley Coffee won the Gold Medal for the best coffee pod in the Prix Epicures OR 2018 Award. Manoj Kumar, the CEO of Naandi Foundation which is responsible for the promotion of Araku Valley, took to Twitter to celebrate the achievement, as you can see above.

Araku Coffee has obviously been around for a while, but the Naandi Foundation's quest to take it around the world didn't start until ten years ago. The gold medal win in Paris may be the coffee's biggest milestone to date, especially since it has taken only a year for it to become as popular as it has in the French capital. Strangely, the Indian market has largely been neglected by Naandi and Araku, but one of its directors, Anand Mahindra, has said that it will not be the case for much longer.

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