Located in the Scottish Highgrounds, Loch Ness (which literally translates to Lake Ness) is an insanely deep lake that dates back to 565 A.D., according to a written note by St. Columba. Since having a long history throughout Scotland, there are a bunch of tours that tourists can take when in the area. From hicking the Highlands to taking a boat down Loch Ness, Scotland sees over one million people every year who only come to see this Loch Ness.

By popular demand, many tourists are attracted to this lake purely because of the Loch Ness Monster (also dubbed as Nessie). While Nessie has never been caught, images of her swimming around the lake have been shared around the world, which is only going to bring more people to the Highlands. From Nessie to the one island holding down the fort in the lake, here are some unknown tidbits about Loch Ness.

10 FOUND IN THE SCOTTISH HIGHLANDS

If you love to hike and explore nature, heading over to the Highlands should be next on your destination. With rolling hills and gorgeous green grass and blue skies, tourists can also find roaming, fuzzy cattle while overlooking Loch Ness.

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The history of the Highlands is even more interesting, dating back to the Middle Ages!

9 LARGEST LAKE BY VOLUME IN THE UK

If you think your neighboring lake is large, Loch Ness probably has you beat. Compared to all the lakes in England and Wales combined — Loch Ness has more water than both. According to Vist Loch Ness, it's the most "voluminous" lake in the UK. What's even more interesting is Loch Ness isn't even Scotland's biggest or deepest lake! Lake Lomond and Lake Morar has Ness beat!

8 IT'S NATURALLY DARK

When looking at Loch Ness's water, you'll notice that it resembles the ocean's. It's wide and dark blue. When looking at other lakes, they vary in color but Ness's is unique, thanks to something known as "peat."

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Peat particles (or turf) accumulates from organic matter and is found quite frequently in Ireland and Scotland. However, due to the peat particles falling in the lake, it makes it darker than others. If you dove into Loch Ness, Telegraph explains you'd only be able to see no more than four inches deep.

7 THERE'S ONE ISLAND ON THE LAKE

Considering Loch Ness is over 750 feet deep (with some parts being even deeper), with over 40 small streams and rivers flowing into the lake, you'd wonder if there were any islands off the coast or in the middle of it — and you'd be right! There's only one small island on Loch Ness and it's Cherry Island at Fort Augustus. It's just over 150 yards from the shoreline and has even gotten smaller in size, thanks to the rise in water from the lake. If Loch Ness consumes Cherry Island, well, then there's no more islands found on this lake.

6 HOME OF NESSIE!

The reason why we're all here: Nessie! The Loch Ness Monster was first spotted in the early 1930s after a photograph showed a hook-shaped monster swimming through the lake. Since then, millions of people go to Loch Ness just to search for this *apparent* monster.

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There has even been search parties and rewards for anyone who caught the monster alive! Although there have been images from tourists and sonograms, the monster has never been caught and appears to be a hoax. People still believe in Nessie, though.

5 IS THE INFAMOUS NESSIE PHOTO A FAKE?

The photo you see above was the first photo of Nessie, photographed by Robert Kenneth Wilson, a doctor from London. After the photo was published, the doctor didn't want his professional image attached to the photograph, so it's simply titled "The Surgeon's Photograph." However, a book came out in 1999 that explained how the image was totally fabricated, using "a toy submarine." The book notes that the submarine and fake neck the doctor used is somewhere in the pits of the lake, but since it's so dark and deep, it's never been found.

4 IT'S RADIOACTIVE?

In 1986, a nuclear incident occurred just north of the Ukrainian SSR. The disaster released airborne radioactivity that effected the USSR and parts of Europe and was called the Chernobyl disaster. Interestingly enough, scientists have noticed the plankton in Loch Ness are different than anything they've ever seen before.

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So different, in fact, that they think these bottom feeders are an after effect from Chernobyl, with radioactive sediment below the lake.

3 AN OFFICIAL LOCH NESS MONSTER HUNT

You can't have a monster that's been "living" in a lake for the past 90 years and not try to find it, right? The crazy part is if Nessie were real, would it really survive 90+ years in this lake? And if it did, was it able to reproduce with another reptile? The questions revolving around Nessie are endless. And the Thatcher government agreed, which is why they created a manhunt to find Nessie. They were so serious, in fact, that they were even going to transport dolphins from America just fo help find it... How that was going to work is beyond us.

2 IT NEVER FREEZES

Scotland has some brutally cold winters but don't expect Loch Ness to freeze. Thanks to the thermocline effect, the water is consistently replaced by warmer temperatures of water from the deeper levels of the lake. Oddly enough, if you do a tour of the Highlands in the winter, you may even see steam coming off Loch Ness.

1 THE TITANIC & LOCH NESS

We bet you didn't think there was a connection between the Titanic and Loch Ness, did you? Well, there kind of is! Dr. Rines was one of the researchers who helped find the Titanic.

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It was his skill and science-savvy that led to creating sonar equipment thorough enough to use to find the shipwreck. Similarly, Dr. Rines use his same mindset to find Nessie in Loch Ness. Unfortunately, his efforts were unsuccessful and he passed away back in 2009.