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Calling all dessert fiends! We’ve rallied up the most scrumptious-looking sweets from around the world. Check out these photos that currently have us drooling.

Greece: Galaktoboureko

Greek desserts are typically loaded with delicious ingredients such as syrup, nuts, and custard. Galaktoboureko is a custard-based Greek dessert that you’ll become addicted to within seconds of trying it. The name actually translates to milk borek, and if you like milky flavors, this is the perfect dish for you.

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Galaktoboureko is made with filo pastry and semolina custard and often coated with clear syrup. It’s often served in large square pieces and the custard is baked along with the pastry rather than being added after baking. Sometimes, the syrup that is served with this dessert is enhanced with ingredients like lemon, rosewater, or orange blossom to add another dimension of flavor.

If you’re a fan of galaktoboureko, then you’ll also fall in love with the Greek dessert bougatsa, which also features semolina custard and filo pastry.

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Germany: Black Forest Cake

You no longer have to go to Germany to get a black forest cake, but we do have the European nation to thank for this decadent dessert. Typical black forest cake features a chocolate sponge cake that is layered with rich cherry filling and whipped cream. In some versions of the cake, a white sponge is used along with a chocolate sponge to create alternating layers.

Not only does black forest cake taste delicious, but it’s one of the most impressive desserts to look at. It’s surprisingly easy to make if you have time and patience, but there are no guarantees that a homemade black forest cake will look as good as storebought version. It might taste as good, though!

Black forest cake is based on another German dessert called Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte, which translates to black forest cherry-torte.

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Russia: Medovik

There are a few Russian desserts that can simply take our breath away. One of them is medovik, the honey layer cake that serves as the ultimate comfort food. Although widely considered to be Russian, medovik is actually found in many Slavic countries and nations that formerly made up the Soviet Union in Eastern Europe.

The main ingredients that give medovik its flavor are honey and condensed milk. There are different variations of this cake, but they all contain honey and lots of layers. Layers of sponge are piled with cream sandwiched in between them to give the cake a soft consistency. On the outside of the cake, a coating of nuts or cake crumbs is often added for decoration and extra flavor.

The cake dates back to the days of the Russian Empire in the 19th  century when Empress Elizabeth fell in love with a honey cake that her chef had prepared.

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Australia & New Zealand: Pavlova

There’s a long-standing debate between Australia and New Zealand as to who really invented pavlova. Most sources seem to point to the fact that the original inventor was, in fact, New Zealand, but you can widely find this dessert in both countries.

An ideal summer dessert, the magic of pavlova comes from a combination of meringue and whipped cream. It’s crisp and firm on the outside while being softy and fluffy on the inside, and quite often has the power to bring dessert fiends to their knees. There are all kinds of pavlovas available today, but the most traditional is topped with fresh summer fruit.

The United Kingdom: Sticky Toffee Pudding

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Steaming desserts like sticky toffee pudding are perfect for the cold British weather. If you have a sweet tooth, you can be sure that this rich and addictive dessert will satisfy all your cravings.

Basic sticky toffee pudding is made with a moist sponge cake that is then covered in delicious toffee sauce. Either vanilla custard or vanilla ice-cream is typically served alongside the pudding as a garnish and helps to balance out the sweetness of toffee.

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