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This Short Film Shows How Drones Can Protect Animals Against Poachers

This incredible short film shows fantastic drone-captured footage of African wildlife.

In the fight against poaching, drones not only provide stunning footage, they also provide protection for some of the world’s most endangered creatures.

That’s what the new short video from LA-based charity Over and Above Africa hopes to show the world.

Written by Andy Fackrell and directed by Sam Coleman, the 90-second video shows phenomenal aerial footage of Africa’s wildlife taken by drones--the same drones that are also helping to protect that wildlife from poachers.

Although the film’s purpose is deadly serious, it starts in a very playful way. It begins with various groups of African animals being presented with their sometimes ludicrous official names. Such as a “tower” of giraffes, a “flamboyance” of flamingos, or an “implausibility” of African water buffalo.

These names were all given by drunk British colonists, just to give you an idea of where they came from.

However, things get serious moments later when aerial footage shows a group of poachers arriving by pickup truck, and then the corpse of a gutted lion.

Over and Above Africa point out in the video that the chances of a creature’s survival increases by 80% when these drones are in the air. Camera-equipped drones can help identify poachers and catch them red-handed (literally), taking away the biggest defense poachers had: anonymity.

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The hope is to raise funds and eventually equip all of Africa’s nature reserves with drones to provide even better protection for endangered wildlife.

“My hope through the film is to expose how ruthless and decimating the poaching industry is to Africa’s wildlife,” writer Andy Fackrell said to Lonely Planet.

“Being in the Serengeti for the first time was a humbling, pure experience that left its mark on me. The delicate ecosystem has to be protected, and drones are proving to be an unlikely savior. Humans can turn this around, but the rangers, who are putting their lives at risk every day, need all the help we can give them. They’re the heroes. If we can supply the tools, the animals can have some sort of chance.”

Fackrell went on to describe how the video’s playful beginning serves as a way to shock the viewer when it suddenly switches to the scene of the dead lion. It’s a clever way to use both the images captured via drones and the juxtaposition of language all in the same video.

You can help the cause by visiting overandaboveafrica.com.

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