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25 Pics Of Canada That Confuse Everyone From America

Welcome to Canada, or, the Great White North, America’s Sweetheart, Lumberjack Country, or Canuckia: The land of overly polite people, who use monopoly money, and start and end most sentences with “eh.”

Our cold-natured country warms nations all over the world with our hilarious stereotypes, that are not all too far from the truth. We choose to live life a bit differently here, and while it may confuse our friends down south in America, to us it is completely normal.

You may laugh at how we eat our Kraft Dinner (with ketchup, of course,) or seriously question as to why our milk comes in plastic bags, and why we pour maple syrup on snow and eat it off a stick; but hey, it works!

Even if we only have one NBA team and one MLB team, Canada is home to a lot of talent, who are proud to call this country home. Drake, Justin Bieber, Celine Dion, and Seth Rogen are just a few of the talented individuals who represent this hilariously, weird nation.

We are here to clear up any confusion you may have. Even as a Canadian reading this, you may learn a thing or two, as well. Here are 25 pictures from Canada that confuse everyone in America.

25 In Canada, Milk Comes In Bags.

via:mtmtv.info

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we prefer to buy milk by the bagged litre. We have the option of buying it in a carton, but we feel it makes more sense to utilize this option.

The way it works is you buy a bag, that is filled with four other bags. Then you buy a pitcher to put one of the bags in, snip the corner, and you are ready to pour.

There’s no use crying over spilled milk; we agree that it is a tad more complicated, but it is also practical.

24 Our National Dish Is Fries Covered In Gravy and Cheese Curds

Via: Dairy Goodness

Let us explain: Here in Canada, poutine is very important to us.

It is not only a Canadian comfort food, but there is a significant culture that surrounds it, originating in the French province of Quebec. Each ingredient is an important food item in Quebec, from the type of cheese curd used, to the specific cut of the potato.

The only thing dividing Canadians on poutine is the actual pronunciation, and it is easy to tell which region of Canada you come from based on this. Outside of Quebec, you will hear “poo-teen,” but in Quebec, you will hear the correct pronunciation of “poo-tin.” How do you say it?

23 Maple Syrup On Snow Is A Winter Dessert

Via: TripSavvy

Let us explain: Here in Canada, maple taffy is what you get when you pour hot maple syrup on snow.

It is not for everyone, we’ll admit, but to us Canadians, it is the perfect wintertime treat. Whether you are walking around in downtown Quebec, or find yourself experiencing a beautiful Canadian winter in the Blue Mountain Village in Ontario, this is something you have to try.

It is best fresh, and watching it being made will put a smile on your face. You cannot get more Canadian than this!

22 Our Bacon Looks Like Ham

Via: Domesticity Nouveau

Let us explain: Here in Canada, our bacon is a little different.o

It is referred to as Canadian bacon, back bacon, and peameal bacon. And, even if it looks like ham to you and me, it is definitely not ham.

Back bacon is still from a pig, but it is made from the loin. Whereas, regular bacon is from the pork belly. The way it is prepared is vastly different, and the taste is nowhere similar as well.

According to the Kitchen Project, the Canadian cut of bacon is significantly healthier than regular bacon, in regards to the fat and calories.

21 Passports Glow In The Dark

Via: Psychedelic Frontier

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we have hidden artwork and colourful images that come to life under UV light.

Since 2013, you can open any page and be pleasantly surprised with the glowing imagery of iconic Canadians artifacts and legends. From Canadian geese, Niagara Falls, and the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa, each page is showcase something special for Canadians.

As creative as this is, it is not only for appearance. The purpose of these images is for security measures. Making them very difficult, if not impossible to replicate or fake, these passports are more secure than others.

20 Santa Has His Own Postal Code

Via: My Grande Prairie Now

Let us explain: Here in Canada, you can write a letter to Santa and receive one back.

Canadian’s take the holiday spirit very seriously. Through Canada Post, Santa Claus has his own unique postal code, H0H 0H0. An added Christmas miracle is that only will you get a return letter, but you do not even need to include a stamp.

Maybe it’s because we are so close to Santa Claus’ village in the North Pole?

19 Maple Syrup Is A Cultural Symbol

via:Brian Vs. Movies

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we take our maple syrup very seriously.

Made straight from maple sap, our country prides itself in this product. Over 70% of the world’s maple syrup is produced in Canada, and 90% of this is produced right in Quebec.

Maple syrup has been a symbol in Canada since the early 1700s. It was originated by Canadian Natives, who were the first ones to discover the capabilities that maple sap offered.

Today, maple syrup is made by harvesting the sap straight from the tree, boiling it, and the bottling it.

18 We Have A Polar Bear Dip On New Year's Day

Via: 680 New

Let us explain: Here in Canada, the bravest and most daring participate in the Polar Bear Dip every New Years Day.

What is a Polar Bear Dip, you ask? It is a group of Canadians running and jumping into the near lake or ocean. There are usually hundreds of Canadians participating, and the purpose of isn’t just for fun- it raises money for charities.

However, this event has been cancelled on several occasions because, well, it was too cold. With temperatures in January dropping as low as the -20s Celsius (plus wind chill!), this charitable event is sometimes postponed, as it is deemed too unsafe.

17 We Have Loonies, Not Dollar Bills

via:iPolitics

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we prefer pocket change over bills. This small change is worth more than you think.

According to the National Post, it is cheaper for the government to produce a loonie than a paper dollar bill. It is more convenient to hold onto this loonie than the alternative. The use of loonies increase a demand for more cash, so it is a win-win from the Canadian government’s perspective.

The loonie to Canadians is symbolic, and as highly regarded as our other national symbols like the beaver, or hockey.

16 Thanksgiving Is Before Halloween

Via: Universal Music Canada

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we celebrate Thanksgiving way earlier than our friends in America.

However, we are just following traditions! Even in Europe, the month of October is recognized as the month of Harvest. It is the best time to have these crops readily available. Also, during this time, there are many celebrations of thanks.

In North America during the 1500s, the first festival of thanks was celebrated, and we have carried these traditions on ever since. To our surprise, the first festival was indeed celebrated in Newfoundland, when an explorer from England arrived in the late 1500s.

15 The Most Famous Coffee Chain Is Named After A Hockey Player

Via: Twitter

Let us explain: Here in Canada, our iconic coffee change is named after an iconic Canadian hockey player, Tim Horton.

Tim Horton the first coffee shop in Hamilton, Ontario in 1964, and it has grown internationally ever since.

The coffee shop even has their own slang to describe the most popular products:

Double Double: A coffee with two creams, two sugars

Timbits: Mini donuts, that are as delicious as the regular size

Timmies/Tims: What we actually call the coffee shop

How to properly use all this slang in a sentence: Going on a Timmies run to get a double double and box of Timbits for the drive.

Unfortunately, Tim Horton’s doesn’t have poutine on the menu yet.

14 The Most Famous (And Delicious) Chip Flavour Is Ketchup

Via: The Takeout

Let us explain: Here in Canada, you can snack on the most popular and delicious potato chip flavour: ketchup.

This exclusive Lay’s snack is only sold in Canada, so if you are heading out on a road trip to America, you’ll want to stock up here.

However, what makes these chips so unique is that they were actually made my mistake. According to CBC, this flavour was a complete fluke. The conveyor line in which the chips were discovered on was meant for fruit flavoured chips. While flavours like grape and orange never came to fruition, they experimented with a tomato-based flavour, not expecting it to go as far as it did.

13 Our Money Is Waterproof

Via: Imgur

Let us explain: Here in Canada, since 2011, our currency is waterproof. Go ahead, you can try this at home.

In fact, they are see-through, plastic, and stretchable. This material is more durable, secure and long lasting, making this new design more environmentally friendly. They are more economical as well, as they don’t need to be replaced as often.

To our friends down south, our currency looks fake. While they do look fake, the material of our bills actually lower the chances for the money to be falsely replicated, decreasing the amount of fraud tied to this.

12 ...And Looks Like Monopoly Money

Via: Time

Let us explain: Here in Canada, our money is all colours of the rainbow: green, red, purple, blue, and even gold.

There are more pros than cons when it comes to opening our wallet and seeing an array of bills. In the States, at first glance, you can easily confused a dollar bills for a mighty 100 dollar bill. Luckily for Canadians, that would be a very difficult mistake to make.

However, we aren’t the only ones who have a colourful wallet. The Euro is a strong example of bright and colourful money.

11 We Eat A Lot Of Kraft Dinner...With Ketchup

Via: Winnipeg Free Press

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we love Kraft Dinner, also known as KD, or mac ‘n cheese.

This bright, cheese-y orange goodness has been a Canadian favourite for the past 80 years. With a recognizable blue box with gigantic yellow lettering, it is difficult to walk down the grocery store aisle without throwing a box in your cart.

This brand has gone to all measures to ensure everyone loves this comfort food. Whole grain and cauliflower based options are available, as well with cheddar and white cheddar flavours, too.

By far, Kraft Dinner is significantly sold more in Canada than any other country in the world.

10 Health Care Is Free For Everyone

Via: Dollar Photo Club

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we can go to doctors and visit the hospital at any time for free.

As Canadians, we probably take advantage of this, and don’t appreciate the real value of this. Being sick and not having to worry about having to get important tests and scans done because of the price, or that going to the walk-in clinic to get your medical questions answered won’t cost us anything.

Additionally, since early 2018, generic prescription medications are free as well.

It is reassuring to know that if we get sick, getting better is the only thing we have to worry about.

9 We No Longer Use Pennies

Via: Canadian Banker Association

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we round the bill up or down.

Not too long ago, we eliminated the penny, which has saved us some room in our wallets. The last penny made in Canada was in May 2012, after being around for over 150 years.

The reason for this was to overall save money. It sounds ridiculous, as it is literally only one cent, but the government has saved over 11 million dollars per year by eliminating it.

While banks still accept the penny, all other establishments do not accept them as a form of payment, and all bills are rounded to the closest 5c.

8 We Use A Lot Of Extra Vowels

Via: Instagram

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we are too often confused with all the different variations in our spelling. Is it favourite or favorite? Grey or gray? Colour or color?

You may need to pull out your dictionary when using the proper spelling in Canada, because most of our words are based on French spelling rules.

We have the Norman Conquest of England in 1066 to thank for this, according to Our Languages. As Canada is bilingual, with both English and French spoken frequently, our words were translated by the French. Therefore, the base of most of our words follow French spelling.

7 There Is A UFO Landing Site, And It Is In Alberta

Via: Vietravel

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we have the world’s very first UFO Landing Pad.

Yes, you read that correctly. In 1967, the town of St Paul in Alberta built the very first UFO Landing Pad, just in case. This is a well-recognized tourist destination, and for years, people would travel from all over to see this.

This landmark is intended to educate those interested in extraterrestrial life. While there have been no aliens to have visited yet, Her Majesty, Mother Theresa, and 30,000 tourists per year have all paid their respects to Canada’s landmark.

6 We Share The Road With Wildlife

Via: How Stuff Works

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we have highways created with extra space for our wildlife.

This is not only for the safety of the animal, but for the drivers as well. According to Canadian Geographic, for the past twenty years, Banff National Park has developed a system for wildlife, and it has drastically decreased the amount of collisions between animals and drivers in this busy park.

This 400 million dollar project upgraded the two-lane highway to a four-lane highway, designed for the immediate concern of keeping animals safe and from crossing the roads at the wrong times.

5 Beware of the Canadian Geese

Via: The Globe and Mail

Let us explain: Here in Canada, the meanest and most terrible citizens, are the Canada geese.

Yes, our people are much nicer than our geese. Ask any local - you must avoid these geese at all times, but that's a little difficult because they are everywhere!

Many large parks or university campuses have signs up saying “do not chase the geese” or “do not go near the geese,” because, they are vicious and will attack. They look innocent, but they are not like the rest of our wildlife here.

You’ve been warned.

4 The Dinosaur Provincial Park Is A UNESCO World Heritage Site

Via: 1photo1day

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we are home to the Dinosaur Provincial Park.

It looks something straight out of Jurassic Park, and it is exciting that it is so well preserved. Located two and a half hours east of Calgary, it is in the valley of Red Deer River. This park houses important fossils from the “Age of Dinosaurs.”

It is noted that Panoplosaurus, Euoplocephalus, and Ankylosaurus all lived in this area of Canada, and had the largest population.

This park was created in 1955 and is a very popular tourist destination, especially for archeologists.

3 We Actually Don't Live In Igloos.

Via: TripSavy

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we do not all live in igloos.

This stereotype has been going on for years that Canada, the Great White North is always cold and everyone must live in igloos. Just because we are north of the border, does not mean the temperature drops the drastically!

It is only in north, north Canada in some of our territories and in Canada’s Arctic, that some Inuit people live in igloos. Igloos, also referred to as a “snow house” are not common, but they do exist.

2 We Didn't Have Our Own Flag Until 1965.

Via: Albumarium

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we used the Union Jack flag until 1964, and then changed to what we have now, the official flag of Canada.

For over 95 years, we existed as a country without our own flag. This was because Canada was considered as a British colony until 1964. What we had, the Union Jack was a representative of our relationship with Great Britain.

Lester B. Pearson had the new flag designed as a symbol of the new Canada. Many Canadians did not agree with the change, and did not want to weaken the relationship with Great Britain.

1 We're Just Really Polite.

Let us explain: Here in Canada, we’re sorry.

Canada’s own Justin Bieber even wrote a song, titled “Sorry,” which just goes to show that we go out of our way to be extra nice.

This isn’t something new to popular culture. This preconceived notion that Canadians are polite and start and end every sentence with ‘sorry,’ dates back to WWII. We managed to get through the time without any serious political problems back home, that did not stand out in comparison to the other countries involved.

While we think the answer to, “Why are Canadians so nice?” is simply answered, “because we are Canadian,” the fact that Canada is one of the most welcoming countries, is also a good answer.

References: National Post, Kitchen Project, Canadian Geographic

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