Something about iced coffee just hits differently. As of late, there's been a serious defensive line regarding the debate between hot coffee vs. iced coffee even though the fall and winter months and it was revealed that yes... iced coffee is, indeed, a year-round beloved phenomenon. With no distinction or rules regarding when an iced coffee can be had or how it begs this one question: Who the heck invented such a brilliant creation and is it as modern and new-age and everyone believes it to be?

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Contrary to popular belief, iced coffee is not as new as everyone thinks it is. It was actually created in 1957 by a man named Dimitris Vakondios who was simply just filling a need. In Greece, it was, and still is, common to mix Nescafé, or any instant coffee, together with sugar and water. Of course, this creates the most modern and simple version of iced coffee but in 1957, Vakondios did it without hot water (none was available at the time) just to see if it would work... and, much to everyone's surprise, it did. Today, the drink is referred to as a Greek frappé.

Going back even further than that, though, was the creation of Mazagran. This iced coffee mixture was thought up by the French military around 1840 during the Battle of Mazagran. While dealing with such intense heat during the battle, the soldiers decided - after running out of milk - that they would make and drink their coffee cold. Thus, it caught on and was brought back to Paris, where cafés began serving it to customers.

How Can You Elevate Your Iced Coffee? Start Making Cold Brew At Home

There is a difference between cold brew and iced coffee and it all depends on how the coffee is brewed and iced. Most people are familiar with an actual iced coffee which is literally what it sounds like: hot coffee that's poured over ice to create a cold drink. While this, of course, is delicious, it's not the same as drinking a cold brew.

Iced coffee can taste watered down after a while while the ice cubes melt, and they will probably do so rather quickly due to the nature of the coffee that's poured over them. However, cold brew is actually brewed cold which takes more time and creates a very concentrated (stronger) flavor. Cold brew coffee can easily be made at home with a cold brew pitcher, many of which cost no more than $20. The pitcher will come with a strainer that gets filled with coffee grinds and after 24 hours, you can discard these and will be left with a beautiful cold brew.

Experiment With Flavor Shots And Flavored Ice Cubes

To prevent coffee from being watered down, the only natural thing to do is to make ice cubes out of the same coffee. If you're making a cold brew, then just pour some of the cold brew coffee into an ice cube tray and allow it to freeze.

If you're making an iced coffee, then try experimenting with some flavor shots to keep the flavor lively and not watered down. Coffee syrups (even sugar-free flavors) can be found easily online and probably at your local coffee shop, and these will give a nice hit of concentrated flavor. You could even add some of this syrup to the milk of your choice and then freeze the mixture in ice cube trays, which won't add any extra water to your drink.

Give It A Quick Blend To Make A Starbucks-Style Frappuccino

We all underestimate the power of a blender at times. These appliances are good for more than just smoothies, though, especially when we're talking about coffee. Iced coffee or a cold brew can quickly be turned into a frothy, sweet, frozen treat with a few quick blitzes of the blender. To this, you can add practically anything from flavored syrups to sugar and spices, and anything in between.

This is also a fun way to play around with different types of milk, as well, and see which ones give your drink the most frothy, velvet-like textures. Topping a homemade frappuccino is almost as fun as making one; with some whipped cream and seasonal toppings, you could just become your very favorite barista. If it's fall, try topping a frap with cinnamon and sugar or coating the rim of the glass with the mixture. For the winter and holiday season, crush up some peppermint and sprinkle it over the top or add some chocolate shavings for some extra decadence.

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