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10 Biggest Differences Between England’s North & South (That Most Americans Don’t Know About)

Stereotypes are present in every single walk of life, especially when it comes to geographical locations. People think they know everything about any given area or destination, when in reality, they may not even know the half of it.

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The findings we're going to pose to you today in regards to the English culture may be pretty common knowledge to a lot of you, but not for the majority - and we're confident in saying that. Here are some of the major differences between the north and south of the country.

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10 The Comedy

The sense of humor in the north is very different from the sense of humor in the south, which is the simplest way we can put it. Northerners are a little bit more over the top, a bit more relatable, and tend to be a bit more willing to mock themselves with their work.

Southerners are a little bit drier and sarcastic, and to be honest, that dynamic works really well. It’s really easy to like and enjoy both styles, and on many occasions, the two overlap quite nicely.

9 The Accents

If you think about what a standard, stereotypical English accent sounds like in your head, then more often than not, you’re thinking about a southerner’s accent. It’s a little bit more 'posh,' and it tends to be the common representation of the English mother tongue on most TV shows and movies.

Again, though, in the north, it’s a little different. Their accents can sound a lot harsher to the untrained ear, when in reality, that’s just how they talk. If you travel 15-20 miles down the road in most southern counties you’ll probably hear the exact same accent, but that’s rarely the case in the north.

8 The Food

In order to properly convey the difference between the two ‘styles’ if you will, we’re going to use a stereotypical British dish as an example: fish & chips. If you go to the north for this delicacy, there’s a good chance that one of the primary ‘toppings’ available to you is gravy, and perhaps even curry sauce.

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In the south, they don’t seem to gravitate towards the idea of lathering your chips in any kind of sauce or substance – aside from ketchup, which is fairly standard. Gravy is a big talking point over there, folks.

7 The Friendliness

There are plenty of Southerners that are perfectly nice and approachable, but let’s be honest, there are levels to this game. When you go to the north, the locals there are just much more relatable and friendly to talk to. A lot of the time, regardless of the establishment, it can feel like you’re being judged down in the south – especially if you go to a particularly 'posh' tourist spot.

The standard phrase that is used is 'the gift of the gab,' which kind of sums up the difference between the two regions perfectly.

6 The Weather

Yes, it rains a lot in England, but that seems to suggest that the weather is exactly the same in every single part of the country. That just isn’t the case, and as tends to the way of things in America, it’s all about the north/south divide.

Northerners, naturally speaking, tend to have worse weather on a consistent basis than southerners, and that’s just the way it is. You’re much more likely to find a spot of sunshine in the south than you are in the north.

5 The Sizes

Because Yorkshire is pretty well known for being the biggest county in the country, the general thought process for many is that the north is bigger than the south. Upon taking a quick glance at a map, though, you’ll realize that isn’t the case.

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A lot of folks outside of the UK mistake Scotland for being part of the English ‘north’ due to how it appears on a map, and in equal measure, people tend to forget about how much of an impact Devon and Cornwall has on the south.

4 The View On Midlanders

The Midlands don't really belong to either of these two categories in a traditional sense. However, interestingly enough, the north and south seem to have polar opposite viewpoints in regards to where the Midlands ‘belongs.'

To put it as simply as we can: the north believes that the Midlands counts as the south, and the south believes that the Midlands counts as the north. In reality, neither of them are correct, but such is the nature of debating the English culture.

3 The House Prices

Firstly: we aren’t just going to restrict this to house prices, because the general price of things in general needs to be brought to your attention. Case in point: try and find a pint of beer for £2 in the north and you’ll have a lot of success, but in the south, that’s like finding gold at the end of the rainbow.

In terms of houses, though, it’s even worse. If you wanted to get a one-bedroom studio apartment in the middle of London with a communal garden, then that’s fine. However, you could probably get yourself a three-bedroom house in the north with a good acre or two for the exact same price.

2 The Sports Culture

Everyone in England loves sports, and when we say everyone, we mean literally anyone. That’s especially true of sports such as football (soccer) and rugby which, as you can imagine, gain a lot of traction in England due to the history behind them within the country.

However, especially in football, it just feels like there are different levels to the support system over there. If you try and compare Arsenal and Chelsea fans to Liverpool and Leeds fans, you’ll see a very, very clear difference in terms of how much it means to them. Essentially, the south is a bit more chilled out, which is cool, whereas the north live and die by the badge on their shirt. As with everything on this list, though, individuals are different.

1 The Politics

This one is going to sound particularly stereotypical, but, of course, we completely understand that there are going to be abnormalities in play. If you look at the statistics, the north tends to lean more towards Labour whereas the south tends to lean towards the Conservatives.

In addition to this, there was a pretty clear divide in the Brexit vote from a few years ago. A lot of it comes down to money and other factors.

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