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10 Creepy Abandoned Hotels From Around The World You Need To See

The modern hotel is derivative of the 17th-century inn. The medieval hotels manifested in European culture as a means to provided temporary shelter to traveling nomads. Since this conception, many hotels have come and gone, though some of them are still holding fast to their grounds. All around the world, the bones of former hotels lay abandoned with nothing but eerie remnants of their former glory. The sight of these places gives off a creepy essence, with only the imagination to give way to what may have happened in the halls of these hotels.

Like anything old, decrypted, and abandoned, these hotels hold whispers of hauntings with the ghosts of its former occupants roaming the grounds of these abandoned hotels. But ghosts or no ghosts, there is some fascinating history behind these 10 creepy hotels from around the world. Here are a few you need to see.

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10 Igloo City

Location: Alaska

This concrete structure was built in the form of an igloo as a welcoming tourist location for those visiting Alaska. The four-story massive hotel came to be sometime in the 1970s. However, it was never opened for business. The hotel owners failed to meet codes during the time, so it was left abandoned, never to be finished.

For a while it was padlocked, but now the curious passerby (usually those traveling between Fairbanks and Anchorage) can stop and take a peek at the barren interior. That’s right: the hotel was forfeited because the inside of the hotel wasn't even fully built. The igloo-shaped hotel sits literally in the middle of nowhere which gives it its notorious creepy persona.

9 The Westin Book Cadillac

Location: Detroit, Michigan

This towering building can’t be missed for those cruising down Washington Boulevard in Detroit, Michigan. The Books brothers started this hotel in the 1920s along with a bevy of real estate options in the hopes to turn the area into one of the most successful shopping districts in the city. It eventually became the tallest building in Detroit and the tallest hotel in the world. It saw temporary success after its completion, with the hotel offering amenities such as restaurants, coffee shops, and even housed a radio station atop its 33rd floor. It was equipped with over 1,000 rooms for guests, with plans of making an 81-story Book Tower.

Unfortunately, because of the Great Depression, the hotel was sold in the 1930s. Since this time, the hotel’s ownership has switched hands dozens of times. That is, until 1986 when the hotel was liquidated of its furnishings, china, and decor. It has tried to seek renovations as recently as 2003 but has continued to fall through. And so, the Book Cadillac remains one of the largest abandoned hotels in the world.

8 Fuu Motel

Location: Japan

The key operation of the former Fuu Motel acted as a love hotel. A love hotel, as you may have guessed, allows short-term rentals for couples who want a little privacy. Located in Chiba, Japan, this resort has only about ten rooms, with each one holding its own theme. Those who have made their way into the boarded motel have seen the weathered walls, deteriorating tubs and mosaics, with broken lights hanging overhead.

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Thrashed sheets cling onto moldy mattresses, with tacky decor thrown vicariously throughout the establishment. The entire essence of this hotel is exactly what you’d expect to see in a horror film.

7 Hotel Belvédère du Rayon Vert

Location: France

An art deco hotel lays abandoned on the streets of Cerbère, France. The building was once a posh resort, complete with tennis courts and a movie theater. From down its barren street, the hotel looks to be the shape of a looming ship, giving it even more of a macabre ambiance.

It opened in 1932 and, although it faced many struggles along the way, didn't close until 1983. It sat abandoned for years until around 2014 when it was resurrected to host a couple of apartments for those willing to stay within its creepy walls.

6 Divine Lorraine Hotel

Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

In the late 1890s, this grand hotel was the home of America’s most wealthy guests. It originally served as apartments and came with a household staff to cater to its inhabitants. It was an architectural exploit, though the lack of elevators was sorely missed during this time. Electricity was introduced as a direct result of the Industrial Revolution, and it later became one of the first racially integrated hotels in the U.S.

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The building, however, closed in 1999 and lay depilated for many years, turning its disintegrating exterior into a haunting gloom for Philadelphia residents.

5 Haludovo Palace Hotel

Location: Krk, Croatia

This hotel, built in 1971, was a million dollar investment. It served a resort stay for vacationers in Croatia, complete with a casino. It was closed after the casino went bankrupt and was left cracked and withering for decades. The only residents to call it home were refugees of the Yugoslav Wars.

Hotel directional signs are still prominently displayed throughout the town, though travelers may be disappointed to find only ruins and crumbling staircases of the once grand Haludovo Palace Hotel.

4 Gran Hotel y Balneario

Location: San Miguel de Los Baños, Cuba

The architecture may look picturesque in the daytime, but the eerie feeling of the long-abandoned Gran Hotel y Balneario in Cuba still lingers on its front steps. The hotel was built as a popular vacation destination for wealthy visitors of the small town of San Miguel de Los Baños.

However, pollution of the water from a nearby sugar mill forced the entire town to evacuate sometime in the 1950s. And while residents have since reclaimed the town, no one seems to want to reenter the grounds of the Gran Hotel y Balneario. It remains abandoned to this day.

3 El Hotel Del Salto

Location: San Antonia Del Tequendama, Columbia

In San Antonia Del Tequendama, Columbia, a 1920s residential mansion was constructed overlooking the Tequendama Falls. For sixty years it operated as a hotel, affordable to only the affluent traveler. It was meant to be renovated in the 1950s, but due to pollution of the Bogota River, the project was dismissed. Over the years, the hotel began to deteriorate until it was left deserted altogether.

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Today, the hotel is said to be haunted. This is owing to the fact that many people have used its alpine location to commit suicide. It is also said that Muisca Indians used to jump into the Falls to evade capture from Spanish conquerors. The myth that those who jump would turn into eagles and soar to freedom, sadly, appealed to most wanderers who would then leap to their death.

2 Kupari Tourist Complex

Location: Kupari, Croatia

While it is surrounded by glimmering seas and beautiful white beaches, the Kupari Tourist Complex in Croatia is anything but lavish. In its heydey, this hotel could bring in over 2,000 guests who would enjoy resort living. The hotel was built in 1919 at a time when Croatia was hoping to pioneer a tourist industry.

Instead, the Croatian War of Independence left the entire city in ruins by 1991. This complex and its neighboring hotels were looted and destroyed. All that’s left of the Kupari are the skeletons of its infrastructure and reminders of a tragic historical event.

1 Coco Palms Resort

Location: Wailuā, Kauaʻi, Hawaii,

The last place in the world you would expect to discover ghostly resorts would be in Hawaii. But in fact, the Coco Palms Resort on the island of Kauaʻi is one creepy abandoned hotel that cannot be ignored. Amongst its tropical oasis, all that’s left of this resort is a hollow shell with little remindings of its glory days. This hotel was once a prime spot for Hollywood movie stars and even appeared in the Elvis Presley film Blue Hawaii.

After a fierce hurricane passed through the island in 1992, however, the resort had to be abandoned. It has never been revived since.

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