Whether it includes Brexit or Royal Family shenanigans, the list of topics upsetting the British seems to be getting longer all the time. Now add to the column of grievances an increasing aversion to travel photos that just look too good to be true.

2,000 respondents

A poll conducted by hotel chain Hampton By Hilton and released Thursday revealed that Britons have had it up to their kiesters with picture-perfect travel images, suggesting that the locale is nowhere near as genuine as marketing professionals would like them to look.

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Of 2,000 respondents who took part in the survey, 29 percent of them preferred to see images that looked more realistic, like the ones that ordinary folks post on social media. Additionally, those images were at least seven more times likely to prompt respondents to take a vacation to the very place where those photos were taken.

Exotic Escape

Another 26 percent of those polled demonstrated a revulsion towards "hot dog legs," in which the photographer, most likely in a lounging position, is taking a shot of some paradise surroundings with that person's thighs clearly visible in the foreground.

"While Brits have nothing against an exotic escape, these kinds of trips only make up around 10 percent of the average person’s annual leave," said a Hampton by Hilton media release, "and the nation are almost twice as likely to be holidaying in London (21 percent) than Spain in 2020 (11 percent)."

Realistic Images

Hampton By Hilton, which had tabulated the results long before making them public, took that information and hired freelance photographer Ian Weldon to snap more realistic images of tourists on their properties in a photo essay dubbed This Is Real Travel.

Some of the images the chain chose to share include women getting gussied up for a night on the town, soccer fans sharing some suds and dancers having a go with a waffle iron.

Hampton By Hilton said the images will be used in a January campaign to celebrate what it calls "real" moments that take place on its properties. Like Brexit, the chain sees an advantage for British denizens to have a realistic yet enjoyable vacation while keeping tourist dollars safely at home.