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10 Places To See Magnificent Meteor Showers

Meteor showers are amazing astrological events that everyone should see at least once in their lifetime. These meteor showers appear at certain times throughout the year, while others only show up once every one hundred years. People travel all over the world to watch them, but what are the best spots to view them?

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The best viewing spots are those with the least amount of light pollution, but certain showers can also only be viewed in specific parts of the world. We have found the best areas combined with certain meteor showers you can see in these respective areas. Keep reading to learn about ten places to see magnificent meteor showers!

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10 Big Bend National Park, Texas

The light pollution here is so minimal you can look up into the sky and see billions of stars from distant galaxies. You can see the Perseids here from August 12th to the 13th, which hail from a constellation called Perseus. It might take some patience to watch these meteors flit by, but the end result is totally worth it. You will be astounded by the magnificent sights you witness flash before your eyes, and you won't be able to wait until next year to see them again.

9 Kielder Forest, England

The Kielder Forest is in England, but it is located near the Scottish border. If you are in Europe, this is the greatest place to view this astrological anomaly for its low light pollution and open air space. You can also view the Perseid meteor shower here, as well as the Draconids shower. The Draconids meteor shower can be viewed on August eighth and is signaled by the waxing gibbous moon. Your mind will be blown with each meteor you watch fly across your vision, as you lie in the forest beneath the stars.

8 Tucson, Arizona

The mountains in Tucson stop the city lights from reaching the sky, reducing the amount of light pollution of the area. There are those who consider this city to be the place to see any astrological phenomenon because the area is so dark and has wide open views of the sky. You can see most meteor showers from this location, but the Orionids are an especially beautiful sight to see. The Earth passes through a field called Comet Halley, which is where these meteors come from, and it creates a stunning pattern in the sky.

7 Canyonlands National Park, Utah

This park is full of peaceful shadows that render a beautiful array of stars, as well as meteor showers. The Ursids are actually from the debris of a comet called Tuttle, and as Earth passes through its debris, the meteor shower is born.

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The comet can be seen every fourteen years, and when watching this shower it is not recommended you use a telescope or binoculars. Your own vision is the best chance you have at catching a glimpse of these magnificent showers.

6 Finger Lakes, New York

The Finger Lake's darkness and low population make it perfect for viewing meteor showers. One shower in particular that can be viewed is the Quadrantids shower, and it produces between 50 and 100 meteors for you to see. It is interesting to know the name of this shower is actually after a constellation which no longer exists, as it was not included in the list of modern constellations. It occurs every year, so even if you miss it once, you can be certain it will be back again.

5 Death Valley National Park, Nevada

This park is also known as National Dark Sky Park, due to the veil of black that covers the area come night. The Lyrids have excellent visibility here and radiate from Vega, which is a bright star located in the constellation of Lyra the Harp. You should have your camera ready as the meteors come and go quickly in the night, and your photo opportunities can be minimal. If you are lucky, they might even leave a trail of ionized gas in their wake, creating a lasting memory for you to hold onto.

4 Brockway Mountain, Michigan

This is in the far north of Michigan, and driving to the summit will give you views you can only find in your dreams. You can see the Geminids meteor shower here, and these beauties are as bold as they come.

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There can be 50 meteors that pass by each hour, so you are guaranteed to see at least one. You don't need any special equipment, but just try not to forget your glasses. You will leave here feeling reborn as you gaze upon the beauty of the stars and watch as the meteors fly by in dazzling lines.

3 Mercantour National Park, France

 

This park in France is a perfect spot to view the dark vastness of the night sky, as well as witness a variety of meteor showers. You can traverse the alps and visit the villages during the day, but at night you should try to stay away from light pollution. You can witness numerous meteor showers here including the Perseids, Draconids, and the Orionids.

2 White Sands National Monument, New Mexico

This place in New Mexico is filled with dunes of white sand and open sky as far as the eye can see. This is a good spot to view the Leonids meteor shower in November and their speed varies from year to year. There are years where thousands are visible, and others there are only hundreds. You should bring a lawn chair or sleeping bag to maximize your comfort, but viewing from a vehicle is also preferred due to the quantity of flowing sand in the area.

1 Denali National Park, Alaska

The Denali National Park in Alaska is far enough away from any civilization and gives you the best chance of witnessing a meteor shower. You can traverse the mountains or travel through the Taigu Forest. You might want to bring a winter coat as the temperatures at night can drop below freezing, but the sights of so many meteors will make it all worth your time. You will be astonished by the meteors that travel across the black sky, as your heart stops with each line of light.

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