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Anne Frank House Gets Renovation To Tell Story To New Generation

The house in which Anne Frank and her family hid from the Nazis during World War II has been renovated with the hope of educating a whole new generation on the topic.

History can be fascinating. Sometimes we get so caught up in tales from the past that we forget they are things that actually happened, long before we even existed. Well, sometimes not so long. For those of us who weren't alive at the time, World War II can feel as if it happened centuries ago. However, it obviously did not, and there are still people alive today who lived through it.

Via: Cris Toala Olivares

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Nothing will make someone who didn't live through the second world war feel the gravity of what happened like visiting places that were key to what occurred during it. The Topography Of Terror in Berlin, for instance, a museum in Germany's capital built on top of the ruins of where the Gestapo HQ once stood.

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Another historical landmark that acts as a reminder of what happened during World War II is Anne Frank's house. The building in Amsterdam where she and her family hid for more than two years while the city was occupied by the Nazis. The house has actually just undergone a two-year-long renovation, as reported by Lonely Planet, with the aim of better educating a new generation of visitors.

Via: twitter.com/AFP

1.2 million people visit Anne Frank's house every single year, and naturally, a lot of those visitors are very young; people who may not know or understand exactly what happened in that building and across all of Europe during that time. "It’s important to go deeper into the historical context and the background to the life story of Anne Frank in the museum," explained executive director of the Anne Frank House, Ronald Leopold.

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The museum that now exists inside the Anne Frank House, and has done since 1960, has been completely changed to help visitors engage and understand what happened back then. The secret annex in which Anne, her family, and other Jewish people hid from the Nazis in silence, however, has not been altered. Visitors will also be able to take a look at Anne's actual diary which was published by her father following his daughter's death.

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