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  • 10 Historical Places You Won't Be Able to Visit Ever Again

    The fire at Notre Dame shocked people across the world. Watching the building burning down in real time, including seeing the spire fall, was super emotional for many people. Thankfully, the fire didn’t engulf Notre Dame entirely. However, there are some landmarks that have been lost to war, climate change, or fell apart over time. These historic buildings and monuments across the world are gone, and no one will ever be able to visit them again. This is a sad reminder to visit the places on your bucket list before they’re gone for good.

    Here are 10 of the historical places you won’t be able to visit ever again.

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  • 10 / 10
    NOTRE DAME CATHEDRAL - PARIS, FRANCE

    Luckily, Notre Dame isn’t gone forever and you’ll be able to visit it sometime in the future when reconstruction is over. But, sadly you’ll never be able to see it how it was before. For one thing, the iconic spire is gone, forever-changing photos of Paris' skyline. Construction originally started on the cathedral in 1163, and it’s considered a great work of French Gothic Architecture. Though much of the damage was done internally and many artifacts were destroyed, you'll still be able to visit its famous 8,000 pipe organ, which remains unharmed.

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  • 9 / 10
    ORIGINAL SHAKESPEARE’S GLOBE - LONDON, ENGLAND

    There have been three different versions of the Globe Theatre built on the River Thames over the past five hundred years. So, while one still exists today, you’ll never be able to see the original. The first Globe Theater was built in 1599 but was later destroyed by a fire, that actually occurred during a Henry VII performance in 1613. A new theater was built that same year, but it was closed in 1642 after a religious outcry. The version that exists now was built in 1997, which sits only a few hundred feet from the original.

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  • 8 / 10
    PORCELAIN TOWER OF NANJING - NANJING, CHINA

    This stunning piece of architecture has been considered one of the Seven Wonders of the Middle Ages. The tower, built in the 15th century during the Ming Dynasty in China, stood erect at 260 feet tall next to the Yangtze River. Unfortunately, this beautiful building was destroyed in the 1950s during the Taiping revolution, but you can still visit a reconstructed version. In 2010, someone donated $156 million to have this world wonder rebuilt, so there's still hope we can knock it off our bucket lists in the future!

    RELATED: 20 Little-Known Things About The Great Wall Of China

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  • 7 / 10
    CHACALTAYA GLACIER - BOLIVIA

    Climate change is altering many parts of the natural world. The Chacaltaya Glacier, located in the Andes in Bolivia, used to be one of the area’s biggest tourist attractions. People would come from all over to go skiing, but because of climate change, this glacier that has existed for 18 thousand years is only small bits of ice now. Before it was destroyed, this glacier was actually home to the highest ski lodge of anywhere in the world. Sadly, the glacier closed in 2012.

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    JONAH’S TOMB - MOSUL, IRAQ

    Jonah’s Tomb is a historical landmark that people could visit up until just recently. Sadly, this tomb, located in Mosul, Iraq, was destroyed as a result of war-related conflict in the area. Jonah’s Tomb was the city's oldest mosque, and was said to be the place where Jonah the Prophet, was buried. Jonah’s Tomb was a place where many people would make a pilgrimage. Sadly, it’s just one of many historical holy sites that have been destroyed by ISIS.

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    SUTRO BATHS - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

    The Sutro Baths opened in 1984 in San Francisco right next to the Pacific Ocean. It was a large complex that had seven pools, slides and trapezes in a large glass enclosure. This huge location could hold up to 10,000 people at a time and also featured a natural history museum inside that had real Egyptian mummies. The Sutro Baths were one of the most unique attractions in the world at the time. Sadly, the cost of operating the baths was too high, and was turned into a skating rink during The Great Depression, only later shutting down for good in 1964 after being destroyed in a fire. Now, the area belongs to the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

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  • 4 / 10
    LOVE LOCKS BRIDGE - PARIS, FRANCE

    The Love Locks Bridge is a fairly well-known tourist attraction that no longer exists. People have been heading to Paris for decades to put a lock on this bridge as a symbol of their love. Decades of locks proved too heavy for the bridge, which is located over the River Seine, when part of it collapsed in 2014. Officials now remove any new locks added, though some people still try to keep up the tradition by putting their locks on lampposts on the bridge, but it’s definitely not the same.

    RELATED: 15 Places That Are A Total Waste of Time (15 That Are Underrated)

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  • 3 / 10
    THE NEW YORK HIPPODROME - NEW YORK

    In 1905 when this theater opened, it was the largest theater in the entire world. Located in midtown Manhattan, the Hippodrome featured a large stage and could sit up to 53,000 people. Some of the biggest stars of the time performed here, including Harry Houdini. Seventeen years after opening, the theater was changed into the Vaudeville Theater. In the following years, it became a movie theater, an opera house, and a sports arena. During the Great Depression, the theater was taken down and now an office building and parking garage take up that space.

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    PALMYRA - HOMS, SYRIA

    Palmyra is an ancient Semitic city that was built sometime in the second millennium, BC. Currently, the area is known as Homs, which is about 200 km north of Syria's capital Damascus. This historical city was a mix of Greco-Roman, Persian and Arabian architecture and culture, and is considered a World Heritage Site. The grand ruins located in the city included a Roman amphitheater and the Temple of Bel. In 2015 these ruins became another target of ISIS and part of the area was destroyed, including the Temple of Bel.

    RELATED: 15 Uncovered Places We Were Never Meant To See (10 That Are Completely Covered)

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    1.THE GREAT MOSQUE OF SAMARRA - IRAQ

    To complete this list is the Great Mosque of Samarra located in Iraq. This mosque was built sometime in the 19th century and for part of its lifetime, it was the greatest in the entire world. Standing at 171 feet high, it had a spiral ramp that people could walk up. The mosque was destroyed in 1278, save for the outer wall and minaret. This same minaret was used as an observation area for US Troops, but was partially destroyed during a bombing raid in 2005.

    NEXT: 25 Tips For Booking A Vacation At The Very Last Minute

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